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Book Review: Eona

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 Eona is no longer disguised as a boy and has now become a Dragoneye. However, she can’t control her power. To make matters worse, she and her comrades are on the run from the evil Emperor Sethon. The only way to stop his terrible reign is for Eona to find the true heir to the Imperial throne: Prince Kygo.

While Eona is one hundred pages thicker than Eon, the plot is still fast-paced. There are many things that keep the book engaging. In addition to the sword-fighting that was present in the previous book Eon, you get to see more magic. One of the most extraordinary feats is the harnessing of lightning in a glass form. However, there is a dark twist to Eona’s magic that makes it difficult for her to use it heroically.

Another element that makes the story interesting is the romance. Even though this is hinted at in the previous novel, it couldn’t be developed because Eona was pretending to be a boy. Now, she is free to be passionate internally and externally about her feelings. Yet, it isn’t all roses and violets. There is a dark twist to it that is connected to her magic.

The only thing that was unlikeable about this book was its ending, which felt a little rushed and abrupt. Despite this, Eona was a great conclusion to the Eon/Eona duet. If you liked Eon, then you’ll definitely like this book.

Book Review: Eon

with 3 comments

In the Empire of the Celestial Dragons, a twelve-year-old boy named Eon has been studying magic and sword-play in order to be chosen as a Dragoneye, an apprentice to one of the twelve energy dragons of good fortune. However, Eon is actually a sixteen year-old girl named Eona. Females are forbidden to use Dragon Magic; the penalty is death. When Eona’s secret is danger of being revealed, she is plunged into a struggle for the Imperial throne.

One of the good things about this book is its refreshing setting. While most of today’s popular fantasy is inspired by Europe, Eon’s world is inspired by China and Japan. This makes the story authentic and gives readers something new to experience.

Another good thing about this book is its protagonist Eona. A reluctant heroine that is armed with magic and the way of the sword, she is reminiscent of the protagonists of fantasy author Tamora Pierce. Something that sets Eona apart from most heroines is that she is crippled in one leg. While this causes her to be looked down at by others, she displays a resilient and compassionate spirit despite the odds.

Fast paced and daring, Eon is a fantastic start to the Eon/Eona duology.

STAY TUNED FOR THE REVIEW OF EONA… COMING SOON.

Written by Serena Zola

May 10, 2012 at 8:02 PM

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